Inhoudsopgave
Something
Something
0-5 weeks
0-5 weeks
5-11 weeks
5-11 weeks
11-16 weeks
11-16 weeks
16-24-weeks
16-24-weeks
24-32-weeks
24-32-weeks
32-37 weeks
32-37 weeks
37-42 weeks
37-42 weeks
Baby
Baby

32-37 weeks

During the 3rd trimester your baby will go through a growth spurt. Your bump has been a moderate size but is starting to grow very quickly now. You can feel your baby move every day and your physical discomforts are increasing. Common discomforts around this time are round ligament pains and a hard belly. You may also feel the baby lowering into the birth canal, this can cause stabbing pains. Your baby is developing rapidly and gains approx. 1-2 kilos during this trimester. You will have a check-up every 2 weeks during this period and together we will discuss your preferences and expectations for the birth. What brings you (and your partner) comfort? Do you prefer a home birth or at the hospital? What is your preferred birthing method, a birthing stool, in water or adopt the principles of hypnobirthing?

Birth plan

We discuss your wishes

A birth plan is a tool designed to better understand and work together during the birth. Many people consider drawing up a birth plan as an important step in preparation. Find out what is important to you and how you want any specific ideas and preferences to be dealt with. Use the birth plan as a method of communication. Clear communication between us and yourselves during the birthing process, making sure you have a say in decisions made, makes it more likely that you can look back on the birth with fond memories.

Draw up a birth plan that is simple and clear so that all maternity staff can quickly see how to best care for you and your partner during the birth. We will schedule a birth plan consultation around 34 weeks.

Below you will find links to help you draw up your birth plan.

Position ultrasound

Around 36 weeks we will schedule for an ultrasound to take place at the practice, to check if the baby’s head is positioned downwards. This is the most favourable position for giving birth. Some babies (3-4%) still have their heads pointed upwards inside the uterus, which is called a breech.

If a breech shows on the ultrasound, we will ask if you would like the baby turned so that the head will be positioned downwards. This is called an external cephalic version (ECV). This procedure is performed at the hospital. Depending on the amount of amniotic fluid, the location of your placenta and whether it is your first or second child, the success rate is approx. 40-50%.

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